Matthew Rodriguez has written a very interesting post on Thebody.com in which he links the recent legal moves in Los Angeles on condom provision for porn performers and new public health policy measures in Philadelphia on the provision of condom machines in schools.

He concludes: ‘Measure B amounts to not much more than a very public campaign meant to promote sexual health, but really only puts the onus on pornographic actors for our private sexual acts. In Philadelphia, the measure to put condoms in schools makes the government and the students share the burden of sexual empowerment: We provide the condoms — and, hopefully, the education — and the students have to make use of them. It is this kind of solidarity and two-way conversation that will lead to true sexual empowerment, not the scapegoating and stigmatizing of the pornography industry.’

I’m not sure Measure B even does as Rodriguez suggests, and I also disagree about his condom observations.  I do welcome their inclusion in schools – although it raises awkward questions about age and sexual play – but I’m not convinced that, even coupled with education, it will significantly change behaviour in the long term.

Advertisements